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How to Identify and Treat Patients with Nutrient Depletion
The United States spends more than $30 billion on complementary health approaches each year, and 42 percent (or $12.8 billion), is spent on natural product supplements, according to the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Ultimately, these figures show that there is a booming market for natural product supplements. One of many motivators that push patients to purchase these natural product supplements at their local pharmacy is nutrient deficiency. Pharmacists are in a unique position to accurately identify and treat patients experiencing nutrient deficiencies.

How to Identify and Treat Patients with Nutrient Depletion
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ACPE Universal Program Number: 0207-0000-16-009-H01-P; 0207-0000-16-009-H01-T
Release Date: September 1, 2016
Expiration Date: September 1, 2019
Activity Type: Application-based

Statement of Need
The United States spends more than $30 billion on complementary health approaches each year, and 42 percent (or $12.8 billion), is spent on natural product supplements, according to the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Ultimately, these figures show that there is a booming market for natural product supplements. One of many motivators that push patients to purchase these natural product supplements at their local pharmacy is nutrient deficiency. Pharmacists are in a unique position to accurately identify and treat patients experiencing nutrient deficiencies.

Pharmacists Learning Objectives
Upon successful completion of this activity, pharmacists should be better able to:

  1. Describe the landscape for alternative medicine in the American-based health care system.
  2. Name common medications and medication classes that cause nutrient depletion.
  3. List patient populations who are at risk of nutrient depletion.
  4. Recommend appropriate vitamins and supplement for patients experiencing nutrient depletion.

Pharmacy Technicians Learning Objectives
Upon successful completion of this activity, pharmacy technicians should be better able to:

  1. Describe the landscape for alternative medicine in the American-based health care system.
  2. Name common medications that cause nutrient depletion.
  3. List patient populations who are at risk of nutrient depletion.
  4. Identify opportunities for a pharmacist intervention with a patient experiencing nutrient depletion.

Any medications or treatment methods suggested in this activity should not be used by the practitioner without evaluation of their patient's condition(s) and possible contraindication(s) or danger(s) of use of any specific medication. This article contains a discussion of off-label uses that will be identified as such by the author.

Target Audience
The target audience for this activity is Pharmacists and Pharmacy Technicians.

Instructions for Participation
To receive a certificate of completion that indicates your eligibility for continuing education credit, you must:

  • Review the content of the activity.
  • Successfully complete the post-test (70% or higher).
  • You will have two (2) opportunities to successfully complete the activity.

Your statement of credit will be issued immediately upon successful completion of the post-test and submission of the evaluation.

Fee
There is no fee for this activity.

Accreditation
Pharmacists
ACPE logoNCPA is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education. This activity will provide 1.0 contact hours (0.10 CEUs) of continuing pharmacy education credit under the numbers 0207-0000-16-009-H01-P and 0207-0000-16-009-H01-T.

 

Faculty
Carlie Traylor, PharmD, is director of clinical services at Chancy Drugs, Valdosta, Ga.

Jake Galdo, PharmD, BCPS, CGP, is assistant professor and community practice residency director, McWhorter School of Pharmacy, Samford University, Birmingham, Ala.

Disclosure Declaration
It is the policy of the National Community Pharmacists Association (NCPA) to ensure independence, balance, objectivity, scientific rigor, and integrity in all of their continuing education activities.

The authors, sponsor, and publisher of this continuing education activity have made all reasonable efforts to ensure that information contained herein is accurate in accordance with the latest available scientific knowledge at the time of accreditation of this continuing education program. Information regarding drugs (e.g., their administration, dosages, contraindications, adverse reactions, interactions, special warnings, precautions) and drug delivery systems are subject to change, however, and the reader is advised to check the manufacturer's package insert for information concerning recommended dosage and potential problems or cautions prior to dispensing or administering the drug or using the drug delivery systems.

Approval of credit for this continuing education activity does not imply endorsement by NCPA of any product or manufacturer identified.

Any medications or treatment methods suggested in this CE activity should not be used by the practitioner without evaluation of their patient's condition(s) and possible contraindication(s) or danger(s) of use of any specific medication.

Software Requirements

PC
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*Adobe Acrobat Reader

MAC
Safari (Latest Version)
Firefox (Latest Version)
*Adobe Acrobat Reader

*REQUIRED TO VIEW PRINTABLE VERSION OF CE LESSON

 


Type:     Internet Activity (Enduring Material)
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