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Counseling Patients on the use of Pharmacotherapy for Insomnia
Disturbed sleep may be one of the most common, yet inadequately treated, health conditions shared by people across the globe. Nearly 70 million people across the United States have a diagnosed sleep disorder, and approximately 50 percent of U.S. adults each year report having trouble sleeping. Insomnia can be defined simply as the inability to sleep, but many complexities hide in that definition. Sleeping difficulties affect people of all types and ages; they may be an acute reaction to an identifiable cause or can develop into a chronic concern that contributes to accumulated sleep debt—the difference between how much sleep is recommended and how much actually takes place. Personal and socioeconomic costs of insomnia develop from lost work productivity, accidents, and increased physician and pharmacy visits. Despite the clear adverse effects of poor sleep, the causes and progression of insomnia make it continually difficult to treat successfully. The July continuing education article describes ways for pharmacists to help patients with this condition.
Specialty Services in Community Pharmacies-What to Consider

Counseling Patients on the Use of Pharmacotherapy for Insomnia
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ACPE Universal Program Number: 0207-0000-16-007-H01-P;0207-0000-16-007-H01-T
Release Date: July 1, 2016
Expiration Date: July 1, 2019
Activity Type: Application-based

Statement of Need
Disturbed sleep may be one of the most common, yet inadequately treated, health conditions shared by people across the globe. Nearly 70 million people across the United States have a diagnosed sleep disorder, and approximately 50 percent of U.S. adults each year report having trouble sleeping. Insomnia can be defined simply as the inability to sleep, but many complexities hide in that definition. Sleeping difficulties affect people of all types and ages; they may be an acute reaction to an identifiable cause or can develop into a chronic concern that contributes to accumulated sleep debt—the difference between how much sleep is recommended and how much actually takes place. Personal and socioeconomic costs of insomnia develop from lost work productivity, accidents, and increased physician and pharmacy visits. Despite the clear adverse effects of poor sleep, the causes and progression of insomnia make it continually difficult to treat successfully. The July continuing education article describes ways for pharmacists to help patients with this condition.

Pharmacists Learning Objectives
Upon successful completion of this activity, pharmacists should be better able to:

  1. Distinguish signs and symptoms of insomnia disorder in the community setting.
  2. Assess patient medical history and daily routine for medical/pharmacological or behavioral causes of insomnia.
  3. Explain the pathophysiology of the sleep-wake cycle and of hormonal sleep controls as they relate to falling or staying asleep.
  4. Select the appropriate OTC option for new-onset insomnia or determine when to refer patients for medical care.
  5. Discuss the different practical administration benefits and risks associated with established and new prescription classes for insomnia.

Pharmacy Technicians Learning Objectives
Upon successful completion of this activity, pharmacy technicians should be better able to:

  1. Distinguish signs and symptoms of insomnia in the community setting.
  2. Identify patient behaviors, conditions, or medicines that may cause insomnia.
  3. Explain how problems falling or staying asleep develop.
  4. Select an appropriate OTC option for new-onset insomnia.
  5. Discuss the benefits and risks associated with established and new prescription insomnia treatments.

Any medications or treatment methods suggested in this activity should not be used by the practitioner without evaluation of their patient's condition(s) and possible contraindication(s) or danger(s) of use of any specific medication. This article contains a discussion of off-label uses that will be identified as such by the author.

Target Audience
The target audience for this activity is Pharmacists and Pharmacy Technicians.

Instructions for Participation
To receive a certificate of completion that indicates your eligibility for continuing education credit, you must:

  • Review the content of the activity.
  • Successfully complete the post-test (70% or higher).
  • You will have two (2) opportunities to successfully complete the activity.

Your statement of credit will be issued immediately upon successful completion of the post-test and submission of the evaluation.

Fee
There is no fee for this activity.

Accreditation
Pharmacists
ACPE logoNCPA is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education. This activity will provide 1.5 contact hours (0.15 CEUs) of continuing pharmacy education credit under the numbers 0207-0000-16-007-H01-P and 0207-0000-16-007-H01-T.

 

Faculty
Nicole Van Hoey, PharmD, is a freelance medical writer and editor in Arlington, Va.

Disclosure Declaration
It is the policy of the National Community Pharmacists Association (NCPA) to ensure independence, balance, objectivity, scientific rigor, and integrity in all of their continuing education activities.

The authors, sponsor, and publisher of this continuing education activity have made all reasonable efforts to ensure that information contained herein is accurate in accordance with the latest available scientific knowledge at the time of accreditation of this continuing education program. Information regarding drugs (e.g., their administration, dosages, contraindications, adverse reactions, interactions, special warnings, precautions) and drug delivery systems are subject to change, however, and the reader is advised to check the manufacturer's package insert for information concerning recommended dosage and potential problems or cautions prior to dispensing or administering the drug or using the drug delivery systems.

Approval of credit for this continuing education activity does not imply endorsement by NCPA of any product or manufacturer identified.

Any medications or treatment methods suggested in this CE activity should not be used by the practitioner without evaluation of their patient's condition(s) and possible contraindication(s) or danger(s) of use of any specific medication.

Commercial Support
Supported by an independent education grant from Merck.

Software Requirements

PC
Internet Explorer (Latest Version)
 or Firefox (Latest Version)
*Adobe Acrobat Reader

MAC
Safari (Latest Version)
Firefox (Latest Version)
*Adobe Acrobat Reader

*REQUIRED TO VIEW PRINTABLE VERSION OF CE LESSON

 


Type:     Application-based CPE Activity
449 Registered Users